The Electric cars VS Petrol Cars Comparision

Electric cars or internal combustion engine cars—which is better? Electric cars were in their heyday back in 1900, but a sudden rise in petrol engine cars, accompanied by battery technology inefficiencies killed electric cars by 1920. However, with recent improvements in battery technology and power electronics, electric cars have made a strong comeback. We will compare these totally different technologies scientifically, and come to understand which is superior. Here we are using Tesla model S as electric car to compare with its petrol engine car counter part.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewcWN-rHQ6Q

Telsa Roadster

Tesla has delivered the ultimate fan car – a revamped version of its original Roadster, with crazy fast acceleration of 0 to 60 mph in just 1.9 seconds, 0 to 100 mph times of only 4.2 seconds, a top speed north of 250 mph and 621 miles of estimated range on a single charge.

There’s nothing quite like seeing the car peel out in person, which I got a chance to do at the Tesla Semi unveiling yesterday, but the video above provides at least some idea of how fast this thing can go. IRL, it’s actually so fast and so ground-hugging that it kind of muddies your brain a bit to look at it operating in a world where physics still exists.

I’m sure we’ll get a lot more looks at the Roadster in action leading up to its launch, which is currently set for 2020. And if you want to be one of the first owners posting videos to YouTube, you can reserve a Founder’s Series edition now, with just $5,000 due immediately, and then the remaining $245,000 due in 10 days.

 

Source https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/17/watch-teslas-new-roadster-show-off-its-record-breaking-speed/

Technology and Transition

Over the last century there has been exponential growth in technology. How able are we to predict the future of technology and what are the social effects of increased technology usage?

Technology and Transition

History and future trends:
The best summary of the history of information technologies is a graph that shows the calculations per second per $1,000 from 1900 to today.[1][2] (Try googling calculations per second per $1,000) What we see when we look at these figures is exponential growth.

Up take of the printing press took hundreds of years; uptake of the radio and TV took decades; uptake of the computer and mobile phones took years. The kitsch and yet astonishing comparison that is usually trotted out in conversations like this is that there is over 100 times more computing power in our smart phone than there was in the Apollo Space Program.

Each time we reach the capacity of one technology, a new one appears that takes the technology to the next level. Vacuum tubes were replaced by transistors, which were replaced by chips, which will probably be replaced by 3 dimensional self-organising molecular circuits or perhaps even quantum computers. Continue reading